Procurement · 31 March 2017

Micro business owners reveal best and worst energy providers

Energy complaints
The most common complaint was the failure to notify customers of the end of a contract
A new league table has revealed which energy providers are guilty of delivering the worst service to small business customers.

The rankings, compiled by Citizens Advice, were calculated using complaints from companies with ten staff or fewer. Severity of the complaints were considered alongside the time it took to resolve issues.

For the second quarter in a row, Extra Energy was ranked bottom out of all energy providers. Extra Energy received a ratio of 1231.2 complaints per 10, 000 customers almost three times more than the supplier ranked second bottom, Business Energy Solutions.

One of the most common frustrations for customers was the failure to be notified of the end of a contract by an energy provider, unexpectedly leading to a more expensive tariff. Customers subsequently reported problems cancelling their contract.

The league table of energy providers was topped by SSE. The supplier received a complaint handling score of just 11.7 per 10, 000 micro business owners.

Commenting on the experiences of small businesses, Gillian Guy, Citizens Advice chief executive, explained that problematic energy providers cause ‘serious? setbacks for smaller firms.

firms rely on a smooth service from energy suppliers to grow and develop. Problems such as inaccurate bills or contract issues can undermine these efforts and waste small businesses? precious time and money, she said in a statement.

Guy added that the league table of energy providers helped business customers compare services and make better informed decisions on contracts.

all energy suppliers must step up efforts to resolve issues quickly and satisfactorily and ensure they are delivering consistently high quality service for their small business customers, she concluded.


 
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ABOUT THE EXPERT

Praseeda Nair is the editorial director of Business Advice, and its sister publication for growing businesses, Real Business. She's an impassioned advocate for women in leadership, and likes to profile business owners, advisors and experts in the field of entrepreneurship and management.

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