HR

Workers want bosses to take active role in wellbeing but worried about privacy

Hannah Wilkinson | 20 June 2016 | 8 years ago

privacy
Some 40 per cent of workers worry that firm leaders with access to such information would use it against them in some way
Almost two-thirds of UK employees want their employer to play an active role in their health, according to new research by PwC but many arenot convinced bosses can be trusted with their personal wellbeing data.

Under half of those surveyed would accept a free piece of wearable tech to support their health and fitness efforts if their employer had access to the data recorded, the survey also revealed. This rose slightly to 55 per cent if such information is offered in return for additional workplace benefits.

Some 40 per cent of workers worry that firm leaders with access to such information would use it against them in some way.

workers are keen for their employers to play a more active role in health and wellbeing, but there is currently a reluctance to share the personal information that would enable employers to do this, said PwC people analytics leader Anthony Bruce.

The UK’s youngest workers are most comfortable with sharing confidential data, with almost three-quarters willing to give up access to wearable tech in return for workplace benefits. In contrast, just 30 per cent of those aged 55 and over would be willing to enter into such a bargain.

given the war for talent, organisations should be thinking about how attractive their benefits and workplace technology are to this next generation of workers, added Bruce.

Employee privacy was dealt a blow recently after a ruling by the European Court of Human Rights in January confirmed that bosses can legally monitor workers? email and instant messenger accounts.

The judge presiding over the case argued that it was reasonable for an employer to want to verify that the employees are completing their professional tasks during working hours.

Small business owner Shobie Lee came under fire during the same month when retail guru Mary Portas took her to task for secretly filming staff in her hairdressing salon in Sidcup and taking them to task when the recordings revealed that they were swearing.

In response to the European Court of Human Rights Ruling, Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development public policy head, Ben Willmott, told the Daily Telegraph: “I think employers need to be clear about the reasons about why they are monitoring so people don’t feel there is this blanket Big Brother approach.

Topic

HR

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