HR · 17 November 2015

Entrepreneur Jason Stockwood: The Apprentice is a parody of real business

Simply Business CEO Jason Stockwood believes 90 per cent of the candidates who make it onto the show would have no future in a real business
Simply Business CEO Jason Stockwood believes 90 per cent of the candidates who make it onto the show would have no future in a real business
Simply Business CEO Jason Stockwood has criticised The Apprentice for painting an unrealistic and unflattering picture of business leaders, ‘saying it emphasises candidates’ negative qualities instead of empowering them.

The entrepreneur’s insurance company was deemed the best company to work for in the UK by the Sunday Times in 2014, and his comments come as new figures from Acas revealed workplace bullying was costing the UK 18bn.

The public body said it had received around 20, 000 calls about harassment and bullying at work during the last year, with some callers to its helpline even considering committing suicide.

While Stockwood said The Apprentice is a classic soap opera? making for good television, he also warned it was a parody of real business, with nothing resembling a sound recruitment process.

Writing for This is Money, Stockwood said: The show is about an aggressive, Platonic ideal of individualism. It’s about backstabbing and intrigue, breeding a mutant offspring of MachiavellI and Mrs T.

While good business is about empowerment? from Stockwood’s perspective, he said the programme instead hones in on the poor participants’ negative qualities, and does everything it can to bring them out.

the candidates here aren’t the business leaders of the future they’re sociopaths in M&S suits, he added.

The process which sees candidates fired by Alan Sugar, then thank him for the opportunity, was Stockwood, said, particularly bizarre. What sort of a business culture is it in which it’s a privilege to be told you’re useless by a Lord

He feels firms with goodworkplace environments instead build people up and see staff cooperating with one another to solve problems, whilecolleagues don’t step on each other to get ahead.


 
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Rebecca is a reporter for Business Advice. Prior to this, she worked with a range of tech, advertising, media and digital clients at Propeller PR and did freelance work for The Telegraph.

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