Payroll

Micro businesses concerned about Autumn Statement

Hannah Wilkinson | 23 November 2015 | 9 years ago

HMRC_Self_Assessment_tax_return
One-person businesses will be liable for more tax and higher NI contributions if restrictions are placed on the self-employment status of contractors
Micro business leaders have expressed concern about how the introduction of a “one-month rule” limit on freelance contractors would impact them, following rumours that limited company tax changes are to be unveiled in the chancellor George Osborne’s Autumn Statement on£25 November.

Some 82 per cent of micro business owners regularly spend more than a month on site with clients, according to new research by Crunch Accounting, and 79 per cent would be unable to continue working as contractors if legislation made them liable for payroll taxes as a result of this work.

The changes would compel firms employing contractors to move them onto the client payroll, and so receive earnings through pay as you earn (PAYE) after a month’s work in order to comply with a tax avoidance rule called IR35 designed to prevent tax avoidance.

As self-employed freelancers currently pay a lower rate of National Insurance, and can benefit from lower rates of corporate tax by withdrawing earnings as a mixture of salary and dividends, harsher regulation could provide an additional 400m of tax revenue for the government, according to the Telegraph but this would come at the expense of micro businesses.

Responding earlier in the month to reports that a change in policy was reputedly under consideration, Chris Bryce, chief executive of the Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed, warned that forcing contractors onto payroll would make operating a freelance business “almost impossible in many instances”, and would cause untolddamage to the flexible economy. “If the government is giving this idea any consideration, they should think again, he added.

Julia Kermode, chief executive of the Freelancer and Contractor Services Association (FCSA), also cautioned that businesses could stop using freelancers because of the huge administrative burden, associated withadding the 4.6m workers who are currently self-employed in the UK to payroll.

The crackdown on how contractors are paid could be announced alongside an end to Entrepreneur’s? Relief, and follows a consultation by HMRC over the summer on the removal of travel and subsidence tax relief for freelancers.a total of 88 per cent of the one-person businesses Crunch surveyed answered no? to the question: Do you feel the current government is supportive of, and understands, one-person businesses

Crunch micro business ambassador Jason Kitcat believes speculation about these policy changes has left micro businesses feeling bruised? but emphasised that the opportunity remains for government to rebuild confidence by introducing measures to support the sector on Wednesday.

 

Topic

Payroll

Related Topics

What is Payroll Flow? How Companies Such as PayFit are Streamlining Payroll Processes for SMEs
21 July 2023

What is Payroll Flow? How Companies Such as PayFit are Streamlining Payroll Processes for SMEs

Read More →
A Guide For Employers & Employees When Working A Week In Hand
1 April 2022

A Guide For Employers & Employees When Working A Week In Hand

Read More →
How has COVID-19 affected payroll?
27 January 2022

How has COVID-19 affected payroll?

Read More →
How does payroll work? Here’s what you need to know
15 June 2021

How does payroll work? Here’s what you need to know

Read More →
Tesco underpaid workers by over 5m. What are the consequences?
20 January 2021

Tesco underpaid workers by over 5m. What are the consequences?

Read More →
Does the new Prompt Payment Code overhaul mean you’ll get paid in 30 days?
20 January 2021

Does the new Prompt Payment Code overhaul mean you’ll get paid in 30 days?

Read More →

If you enjoy reading our articles,
why not sign up for our newsletter?

We commit to just delivering high-quality material that is specially crafted for our audience.

Join Our Newsletter